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The suspects in the shootings at a Uvalde, Texas, elementary school and a Buffalo, New York, supermarket were both just 18 when authorities say they bought the weapons used in the attacks. They were too young to legally purchase alcohol or cigarettes, but old enough to arm themselves with assault weapons. They are just the latest suspected U.S. mass shooters to obtain guns because of limited firearms laws, background check lapses or law enforcement’s failure to heed warnings of concerning behavior. The Buffalo suspect, for example, was taken to a hospital last year for a mental health evaluation, but that didn't trigger New York’s “red flag” law.

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Pittsburgh Steelers general manager Omar Khan is embracing his new role with the club. Khan was recently promoted to take over for Kevin Colbert, who is retiring after a long run with the team that included a pair of Super Bowl victories. Khan is no stranger to the Steelers. He has been with the team for more than 20 years, most recently serving as a vice president of football operations and business administration. Khan says he's excited about the trajectory of the team, adding that while he is bringing in some new faces to the team's front office, the club's high standards will not change.

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Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards watched a key video of Black motorist Ronald Greene's deadly 2019 arrest six months before prosecutors knew it existed. The Democratic governor has distanced himself from allegations of a cover-up, saying evidence was promptly turned over. But an Associated Press investigation found that wasn’t the case with the video he watched in October of 2020. It didn't reach those with the power to charge troopers who stunned, punched and dragged Greene until nearly two years after his death. Edwards' lawyer says the governor couldn't have known at the time that prosecutors didn't have the video.

A bipartisan group of senators is trying to find a compromise on gun legislation. That's after Democrats’ first attempt at responding to the mass shootings in Buffalo, New York, and Uvalde, Texas, failed Thursday in the Senate. Republicans blocked debate on a domestic terrorism bill that would've opened debate on hate crimes and gun policy. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer says he'll give negotiations about two weeks while Congress is in recess. The bipartisan group of senators met after the vote and focused on background checks for guns purchased online or at gun shows, red-flag laws designed to keep guns away from those who could do harm and school security measures.

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Women from the remote U.S. territories of Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands will likely have to travel farther than other Americans to terminate a pregnancy if the Supreme Court overturns a precedent that established a national right to abortion in the United States. Hawaii is the closest U.S. state where abortion is legal under local law. It’s already difficult to get an abortion in Guam, a small, heavily Catholic U.S. territory south of Japan. The last physician who performed surgical abortions there retired in 2018. Two Guam-licensed physicians who live in Hawaii see patients virtually and mail them pills for a medication abortion.

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Iraqi lawmakers have passed a bill criminalizing any normalization of ties and any relations, including business ties, with Israel. The law was approved on Thursday, with 275 lawmakers voting in favor of it in the 329-seat assembly. Violating the law would be punishable with the death sentence or life imprisonment. An influential Shiite cleric called for Iraqis to take to the streets to celebrate the bill and hundreds later gathered in central Baghdad, chanting anti-Israel slogans. It's unclear how the law will be implemented as Iraq and Israel have no diplomatic relations.

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U.S. land managers have given final permissions for a 416-mile transmission line that would connect wind farms in eastern Wyoming with customers in Utah and elsewhere across the West. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management on Thursday said it has notified Portland-based PacifiCorp it can proceed with its Energy Gateway South Transmission line. The line will run from the Medicine Bow, Wyoming area, across northwestern Colorado, and end south of Salt Lake City. The Biden administration has promoted renewable energy in the West but delivering that power to customers will require major upgrades to the nation’s aging electrical grid.

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U.S. land managers have given final permissions for a 416-mile transmission line that would connect wind farms in eastern Wyoming with customers in Utah and elsewhere across the West. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management on Thursday said it has notified Portland-based PacifiCorp it can proceed with its Energy Gateway South Transmission line. The line will run from the Medicine Bow, Wyoming area, across northwestern Colorado, and end south of Salt Lake City. The Biden administration has promoted renewable energy in the West but delivering that power to customers will require major upgrades to the nation’s aging electrical grid.

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New coordinator Wink Martindale is going to try to make the New York Giants defense more aggressive this season. Speaking Thursday before an organized team activity at the Giants headquarters in the Meadowlands, Martindale said he wants his units to dictate what opposing offenses can run. The 59-year-old former Ravens coordinator is known for running a defense that relies a lot on blitzes. However, he plays to use multiple schemes to force opposing quarterbacks and coordinators to adjust. New York is coming off a 4-13 season under new head coach Brian Daboll. It hasn't made the playoffs since 2016.

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A jury has convicted a New Hampshire man of first-degree murder for killing his wife’s coworker after he discovered they were texting, and then forcing her to behead him. Armando Barron also was convicted of assaulting his wife, Britany Barron, the night he discovered she had been texting with her coworker, Jonathan Amerault. Prosecutors said he used her cellphone to lure him to a park just north of the Massachusetts state line in September 2020. Barron also was convicted of beating and kicking Amerault, forcing him into his own car and shooting him. Amerault’s mother was in the courtroom and started crying as the verdict was read. The jury in Keene, New Hampshire, had the case for a little under two hours before the verdict.

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It’s become a common sight: jubilant Starbucks workers celebrating after successful votes to unionize at dozens of U.S. stores. But when the celebrations die down, a daunting hurdle remains. To win the changes they seek, like better pay and more reliable schedules, unionized stores must sit down with Starbucks and negotiate a contract. It’s a painstaking process that can take years. And it's all happening amid tensions between Workers United, which represents the unionized stores, and the Seattle coffee giant. Already, the NLRB has filed 45 complaints against Starbucks for various labor law violations, including firing workers for union activity. Starbucks has filed two complaints against the union, saying labor organizers harassed and intimidated workers at some stores.

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A bipartisan group of senators is trying to find a compromise on gun legislation. That's after Democrats’ first attempt at responding to the back-to-back mass shootings in Buffalo and Uvalde, Texas, failed Thursday in the Senate. Republicans blocked debate on a domestic terrorism bill that would have opened debate on hate crimes and gun policy. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer says he will give negotiations about two weeks while Congress is in recess. The bipartisan group of senators met after the vote and focused on background checks for guns purchased online or at gun shows, red-flag laws designed to keep guns away from those who could harm themselves or others and school security measures.

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Riot police in the northern Greek city of Thessaloniki have fired tear gas to disperse crowds attacking them with gasoline bombs and stones during a protest against government plans to introduce policing on university campuses. About 5,000 members of left-wing and anarchist groups took part in a march through the city center Thursday night, with some smashing shop windows and setting rubbish bins on fire. At least eight people were detained. No injuries were reported. The protesters are angry at government plans to introduce a new police body to guard university campuses, which lack effective private security and have suffered from political violence as well as petty crime.

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Wisconsin’s Republican Assembly leader, who will appoint a key member of the state’s bipartisan elections commission, says he is not “ruling anybody in or out” as he looks to quickly fill a vacancy in the battleground state before the next chair of the panel is chosen. Assembly Speaker Robin Vos told The Associated Press on Thursday that also would not rule out appointing the embattled investigator he hired to look into the 2020 election. Vos says he intends to appoint someone before the commission’s meeting in two weeks where a new chair will be selected.

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The Palestinian Authority says its investigation into the shooting death of Al Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh proves that she was deliberately killed by Israeli forces. Israel's defense chief called that “a blatant lie.” Abu Akleh, a veteran Palestinian-American reporter for Al Jazeera’s Arabic service, was shot in the head on May 11 during an Israeli military raid in the occupied West Bank. The Palestinian attorney general announced the results of his investigation at a news conference on Thursday. He says soldiers were aware journalists were in the area and that Abu Akleh was shot “directly and deliberately” as she tried to escape.

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Authorities say a woman in West Virginia fatally shot a man who began firing an AR-15-style rifle into a crowd of people at a party. Charleston Police say 37-year-old Dennis Butler was killed Wednesday night after he pulled out the rifle and began shooting at dozens of people attending the birthday-graduation party outside an apartment complex. Police say the woman drew a pistol and fired, killing Butler. No one at the party was injured. Charleston Police spokesman Tony Hazelett said on Thursday that the woman saved several people's lives. He said no charges would be filed against her.

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Democratic Attorney General Josh Kaul is preparing to ask Republican lawmakers to sign off on $378,000 in settlements to resolve multiple pollution cases. GOP legislators passed a law in 2018 that requires the attorney general to get permission from the Legislature's finance committee before entering into any settlement agreements. Kaul is scheduled to bring nine proposed deals before the committee on Tuesday. Two of the cases involve factory farms Emerald Sky Dairy LLC and Blue Royal Farm Inc. Two others involve municipal water system violations in the city of Elkhorn and the village of Wilson.

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A new lawsuit says a 13-year-old boy shot in the back by a Chicago police officer was unarmed and had his arms raised to surrender when he was hit by the bullet. Thursday's filing in Chicago federal court says the incident illustrates deeply flawed implementation of department policy on the pursuit of suspects. The filing says the bullet severely damaged part of the Black teenager’s spine when he was shot May 18. Police previously said the boy was in a car suspected of involvement in a carjacking the day before and that he jumped out and ran. He hasn’t been charged. Police Supt. David Brown has said the fleeing teenager turned toward the officer before the officer fired. Chicago's law department says it hadn’t been officially served and wouldn’t comment on pending litigation.

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Pakistan’s defiant former Prime Minister Imran Khan has called off a planned, open-ended sit-in in Islamabad. The development on Thursday temporarily assuaged fears of a protracted civil conflict after Khan led thousands on a march toward Parliament in Islamabad, demanding the government’s resignation. Khan’s followers began converging on the Pakistani capital on Wednesday, with some 10,000 reaching the city center around midnight. Khan himself entered the city as part of a large convoy of cars, buses and trucks, with demonstrators waving flags and rallying overnight. Some protesters clashed with police outside Parliament. Khan gave Prime Minister Shahbaz Sharif — who replaced him in April — less than a week to call for new elections.

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Roman Abramovich's ownership of Chelsea is ending in a way unimaginable when he was on the field in February celebrating the team's FIFA Club World Cup triumph. It was only in November that Abramovich was seen back at Stamford Bridge for the first time in more than three years being feted by the president of Israel for his antisemitism activism. Ultimately, it was Abramovich's ties to Russian President Vladimir Putin that led to him losing control of Chelsea. An enforced sale after Abramovich was sanctioned is concluding after three months with American investor Todd Boehly fronting a new ownership group.

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Onlookers urged police officers to charge into the Texas elementary school where a gunman’s rampage killed 19 children and two teachers. That's what a witness said Wednesday as investigators worked to track the massacre that lasted upwards of 40 minutes and ended when the 18-year-old shooter was killed by a Border Patrol team. Juan Carranza saw the scene from outside his house, across the street from Robb Elementary School in the town of Uvalde. Carranza said the officers did not go in. Minutes earlier, Carranza had watched as Salvador Ramos crashed his truck into a ditch outside the school, grabbed his AR-15-style semi-automatic rifle and shot at two people.

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Within the eight- and even nine-figure sums trumpeted for CEOs each year, just a small portion is actual cash. Last year, only a little more than a quarter of compensation for the typical CEO came from cash salary or bonus.  Instead, most of a CEO’s pay tends to come from grants of stock and grants of stock options. That’s often by design, because shareholder advocates have pushed for CEO pay to be more closely aligned with their own returns. Companies are also tying some of their CEOs' pay to such considerations as environmental impact as compensation formulas get even more complicated.

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Japan’s military says Japanese and U.S. forces have conducted a joint fighter jet flight over the Sea of Japan, in an apparent response to a Russia-China joint bomber flight while U.S. President Joe Biden was in Tokyo. It says the Japan-U.S. flight on Wednesday was meant to confirm the combined capabilities of the two militaries and further strengthen the countries' alliance. The flight occurred hours after North Korea fired three missiles, including an intercontinental ballistic missile, toward the sea between the Korean Peninsula and Japan. The missiles fell in waters outside of Japan’s exclusive economic zone.

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Officials say a manufacturer of electrical power distribution connectors plans to locate in western Kentucky and create 150 jobs. A statement from Gov. Andy Beshear says Hollobus Technologies Inc. is investing $2.25 million to move its headquarters and some operations to a former Briggs & Stratton plant in Murray. Officials say the Kentucky location will produce a new product line that is an alternative to electrical cabling for large industrial projects. The company has partnered with Murray State University to establish a pipeline for workers and said it intends to focus on hiring veterans.

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President Joe Biden has signed an executive order to improve accountability in policing. It's a meaningful but limited action on the second anniversary of George Floyd’s death that reflected the challenges in addressing racism, excessive use of force and public safety with a deadlocked Congress. Most of the order issued Wednesday is focused on federal law enforcement agencies — for example, requiring them to review and revise policies on use of force. It will also create a database to help track officer misconduct. The administration cannot require local police departments to participate in the database, which is intended to prevent problem officers from job-hopping. The order also restricts the flow of surplus military equipment to local police.

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