Debra Saunders: Trump Impeachment Inevitable
other VIEW

Debra Saunders: Trump Impeachment Inevitable

  • 0
{{featured_button_text}}

WASHINGTON — I covered President Bill Clinton’s House impeachment and the Senate’s vote not to convict him. I thought the House was right to impeach and the Senate right not to convict. Clinton’s lying under oath was serious enough to merit censure, but it was not so serious as to overturn an election.

The country would have been better served if Congress had followed Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s call for Clinton to be censured; the California Democrat sponsored a resolution that never made it to the Senate floor.

No doubt aware of how bloodthirsty the right appeared in impeaching Clinton, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has posed as a reluctant supporter who got dragged into this mess against her instincts. But it’s been clear for months that her House would impeach President Donald Trump and she would be at the head of the posse.

When Pelosi announced Tuesday she would call for a formal impeachment process, the House Judiciary Committee had already conducted what Chairman Jerry Nadler referred to as its first impeachment hearing.

Besides, if Pelosi were truly reluctant, she might have waited for the pending release of the transcript of the July 25 phone conversation between President Trump and Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky.

Problem: Democrats waited two years for special counsel Robert Mueller to prove the Trump campaign colluded with Russian operatives in 2016. But he didn’t.

They were wrong. They believed every rumor without waiting for evidence. So now they’re not going to wait for proof, as Thursday’s House Intelligence Committee hearing that put acting director Joseph Maguire on the hot seat demonstrated.

In their world, every accusation (against Trump, anyway) is righteous and true, while every accuser — excuse me, whistleblower — is a hero. Hearsay is irrefutable evidence, and every national security leak is an opportunity. They’re going straight for the kill.

For the left, it’s impeach or die.

Of course, Republicans will be appalled, including those who aren’t big Trump fans, because Democrats have been rabid in trying to destroy this president and everyone around him. Their lack of fundamental fairness was used to destroy the reputation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, and now some Democratic candidates want to impeach him, too.

They’re so overboard conservatives may feel inclined to ignore Trump’s role in his situation. The president of the United States handed his critics a stick when he tried to coax a vulnerable Eastern European ally in need of U.S. military aid to do his campaign’s dirty work for him.

Once again, Trump’s disregard for institutional boundaries gets him into trouble. He treats world leaders as if they’re campaign retainers and his private attorney, Rudy Giuliani, as if he’s a top U.S. emissary.

As the most powerful man in the world, Trump really ought to have better things to do than scheme about how to embarrass a potential 2020 rival and enlist a foreign president to help him. But he can’t help himself.

He doesn’t seem to care that his disregard for the consequences of giving into his lesser impulses hinders his ability to get things done — or about the stress it places on his staff and political allies.

Last week, as the Ukraine phone call story popped, Trump tweeted that, knowing many U.S. officials listen in on his phone calls, “Is anybody dumb enough to believe that I would say something inappropriate with a foreign leader while on such a potentially ‘heavily populated’ call”?

Well, yes.

Nancy Pelosi was always going to impeach Donald Trump, and he was always going to make it easy for her.

Contact Debra J. Saunders at dsaunders@reviewjournal.com or 202-662-7391. Follow @DebraJSaunders on Twitter.

0
0
0
0
1

Catch the latest in Opinion

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

Small news organizations in rural states aren’t often on the front line of broad public service journalism, but times are changing and one-or-two person shops can make a lot of difference in public awareness of issues if things come together.

A small outbreak of coronavirus at a Fry Foods plant in Weiser gives a prime example of the importance of testing for COVID-19. More than that, it represents a warning shot across the bow of potential pitfalls if we don’t reopen our economy the right way.

As we tiptoe through Stage 2 of Gov. Brad Little’s phased reopening plan and approach a more robust Stage 3, it’s going to become even more important that we take the necessary steps to prevent future outbreaks.

And there will be future outbreaks.

The fact remains that the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 is still out there. It’s ready to strike again, and without a vaccine, it remains a potentially destructive and fatal disease.

Aggressive and quick testing remains one of the key elements — perhaps the most important element — of controlling outbreaks at this point.

Fry Foods offers an early case study.

The Weiser food processing plant employs 260 people to make onion rings and other food products. It shut down earlier this month when at least seven employees tested positive for the coronavirus.

Fry Foods initially didn’t test all 260 employees at the Weiser facility — only the 50 or 60 who likely came in contact with the employees who tested positive. Other employees were able to get tested on their own.

The Idaho Bureau of Laboratories (state run-laboratories) tested all that they had the capacity to do in one day, according to Kelly Petroff, director of communications for the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. The state lab can do about has a testing capacity of approximately 200 tests per day.

“We are not prepared to handle this,” Doug Wold, human resources manager for Fry Foods, told the Idaho Statesman, referring to the lack of coordinated response. “If you don’t have an employer who’s willing to be proactive, we’re just going to fail.”

Fortunately, Crush the Curve Idaho, a private, business-led initiative established during the outbreak to increase testing, stepped in and tested every employee at Fry Foods.

By Tuesday of this week, 20 employees — about 8% of the plant’s workforce — had tested positive for the coronavirus, along with at least two of their family members. Nearly all were asymptomatic.

RAPID-RESPONSE TESTING

That’s what needs to happen: rapid-response testing. If you have an outbreak at your workplace, get everyone tested. For those who test positive, keep them home and isolated. For those who test negative, they can keep on working and you’re back in business.

When the outbreak hit Fry Foods, company officials made the decision to shut the plant down.

Without adequate testing, that’s unfortunately the right thing to do. Without testing, you have no idea whether you have seven infected employees, 70 or 270.

We applaud Fry Foods company officials for making the tough call to shut down, even though they were given the green light by the Southwest District Health Department to resume operations.

Coronavirus is stealthy. A person can carry coronavirus longer without symptoms, potentially spreading to others unwittingly. Some people who carry coronavirus have no symptoms at all.

We are encouraged that Crush the Curve Idaho stepped up and stepped in here.

But Idaho needs a more concerted and organized plan to do rapid-response testing.

We are a fragmented health system. Health providers include Saint Alphonsus, St. Luke’s, Primary Health, Saltzer, among others. Then think about all the entities who pay for health care: Blue Cross of Idaho, Regence BlueShield, PacificSource, SelectHealth, etc. Throw in Medicare, Medicaid and those who are uninsured.

Even our own government health management system is fragmented, with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare and seven independent health districts not operated by the state.

And, in the case of Fry Foods, situated in a city bordering Oregon, workers were from two states.

NO COORIDINATED EFFORTS

No wonder Fry Foods officials were at a loss for where to turn for help. Without some sort of coordinated effort to test all employees and somehow pay for those tests, shutting down the plant was the best option.

It’s worth noting that the Fry Foods employee who initially had coronavirus was at a family gathering of a larger number than outlined in the governor’s reopening plan and was with visitors from out of state, two violations of the governor’s guidelines. That’s why we have the guidelines, and that’s why it’s important to follow the guidelines. Otherwise, this is what you get: an outbreak that shuts down an entire food manufacturing plant.

Unfortunately, shutting down operations every time there’s an outbreak is not going to get the job done.

And there will be more outbreaks as we reopen our economy, reopen factories and workplaces.

Idaho has a lot to be optimistic about, and we have a golden opportunity to lead the nation in reopening our economy in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. We have had relatively few cases (around 2,300) and few deaths (77). Our early efforts to shut down parts of our social interactions and Little’s quick call to issue a statewide stay-home order clearly have paid off. Idahoans’ adherence to the stay-home order has helped to flatten the curve and control the number of new cases. Residents and businesses, alike, have done their part to make this happen.

Our hope is that Idaho can chug along through the stages of reopening. Our fear is that if we don’t do this the right way, we’ll have a surge and we’ll be back to a statewide stay-home order. Nobody wants that.

If Joe Biden is counting on African American votes to win the White House in November, he may want to reboot his outreach strategy. During a radio interview Friday morning with Charlamagne tha God on the nationally syndicated, "The Breakfast Club," Biden said that "if you have a problem figuring out whether you're for me or Trump, then you ain't black." It took a handful of nanoseconds for the ...

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News