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3 ways a simple lacrosse ball can replace an expensive massage
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3 ways a simple lacrosse ball can replace an expensive massage

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(AMAZON)

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With restrictions to personal services still in place across the country, booking your usual massage might be out of the question. Fortunately, you can tide yourself over and work out knots and tension on your own using a few simple tricks and a lacrosse ball.

1) Work out low back tension.

If you’re working from home at a desk all day, you might notice new tension in your lower back. Since your core can’t engage while seated in a standard office chair, your lower back muscles pick up the slack and become strained.

To relieve tension, lie on your back with your knees bent and place the lacrosse balls on either side of your spine under your lowest rib but above your pelvis. Alternate from side to side, dropping one knee down to the floor in a clam shell motion, then bringing it back up to center again. This motion will help release the quadratus lumborum, a deep abdominal muscle often responsible for lower back pain. You can also roll the lacrosse balls up and down gently by scooting your body in either direction.

2) Alleviate plantar fasciitis while you work.

Plantar fasciitis is a common painful condition where the plantar fascia, a thick band of tissue running along the sole of the foot, becomes inflamed. This inflammation can cause an ache or bruised feeling on in the bottom of the heel or arch of the foot. For a simple self-massage you can do while you’re answering morning emails, place the lacrosse ball under the arch of your foot while seated. Then, lean forward to apply a comfortable pressure and run the ball slowly along the arch of your foot.

3) Break up upper back, neck, and shoulder knots.

If you feel like you constantly have tender or tight spots in your upper back, neck, and shoulders, overworked or strained trapezius or rhomboid muscles could be the culprit. To work out the tension, stand with your back against the wall with a lacrosse ball between your upper back and the wall. Move up and down or left to right while avoiding the spine until you hit the tender spot, then gently lean back to apply more pressure.

Kieba Masage Lacrosse Balls for Myofascial Release available from Amazon

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