BUHL — The Buhl Public Library will begin its winter and spring adult book talks this month at 215 Broadway Ave. N.

The first session will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 16, with Ray Holm leading the discussion of Thomas L. Friedman’s nonfiction book “Thank You for Being Late.” Friedman, a New York Times columnist, takes a look at the acceleration of change in a world that may not be ready for it and the key factors causing it.

A book discussion will be held at 7 p.m. Feb. 13 with Mike Cothern exploring “H is for Hawk” by Helen MacDonald. A prize-winning book and Amazon’s best book for March 2015, this nonfiction work tells the story of an author overcome with grief who seeks to come back to normal through working with the notoriously prickly and murderous goshawk, Mabel, a deadly bird of prey.

With the recent release of Ken Burn’s documentary on the Vietnam War, comes a look back at a major fiction work about the Vietnam War “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien. This book talk is scheduled for 7 p.m. March 13 with Eileen Scheldt leading the discussion. O’Brien, a Vietnam veteran, has used his war experiences to create compelling fiction works about the war. The book is a collection of linked short stories and is semi-autobiographical inspired by O’Brien’s own experience there as an Army sergeant.

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The book talk on April 17 brings another nonfiction title by a favorite book talk author Timothy Egan. He visited the College of Southern Idaho last year to discuss this book and was featured at an Idaho Humanities Council presentation in Boise. “The Immortal Irishman: The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an American Hero” tells the story of Thomas Francis Meagher who led a failed uprising in Ireland during the Great Hunger of the 1840s, was banished to a Tasmanian prison, and wound up in America leading an Irish brigade during the Civil War at Bull Run, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. Cindy Bjorneberg Snyder will lead the discussion.

On May 15, Elizabeth Smith will lead a discussion on the fiction book “The Kitchen House” by Kathleen Grissom. Another Irish immigrant figures in this novel, a young girl, Lavinia, who arrives orphaned and must take work as an indentured servant on a slave plantation in the South. Lavinia provides insights into class, race, dignity, buried secrets and familial bonds.

All of the programs are free and the books are available for check out from the library. Information: 208-543-6500.

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