The motivation: When Bill Young and his wife, Dena, moved to Kimberly, some of the furniture they brought from California didn’t fit in their new home. Their round table, for instance — it was too big to fit comfortably inside the small dining room.

So Bill, who’s been building furniture with old wood for several years, had a solution: Build a table to fit. He gathered discarded barn wood and an old, rusted wheel and set to work on the octagonal table. The only thing new about the table is the trim, which he purchased at an area lumber store and stressed with a chain to look old, and the padding for the back of the benches, which Dena helped put together.

The bill: Young completed the project for less than a hundred bucks, he said. Most of the expense came from new wood for the trim and fabric for the backrests. 

The timeline: The project took Bill about a week in January. “The framing went up pretty quick,” he said. “I spent about half the time thinking about how I was going to do this.”

Bang for the buck: “You couldn’t buy this at the store,” Bill said. The table seats seven people comfortably, his wife is happy with the table, and he can pass it on to his son. 

Biggest challenge: Designing the table octagonally and making sure the wood was lined up correctly.

Skills learned: Bill said he learned a lot from the table project because he didn’t use any blueprints. If he could do it again, he would do some things differently, but for the most part he’s pleased. Perhaps the biggest thing he learned was patience, he said. 

What’s next: Bill’s not sure what his next project will be, though there’s a shower in his basement that still needs to be finished. He has pretty much reworked his whole house with homemade furniture, so he won’t stay idle for long. “I have to have something to do.”

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