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Crime-and-courts
5th District Court News: Twin Falls County

TWIN FALLS COUNTY

FELONY SENTENCINGS

Robert Lester Kreger, 52, Twin Falls; possession of a controlled substance, $285.50 costs, $100 DNA, $731.93, seven years penitentiary, two and a half years determinate, four and a half indeterminate, 82 days credited.

Shelina Rae Mowrey, 47, Twin Falls; possession of a controlled substance, $285.50 costs, seven years penitentiary, three years determinate, four indeterminate, twenty days credited, 365 days retained jurisdiction, sentence to run concurrent to 2016 case.

Shelina Rae Mowrey, 47, Twin Falls; possession of a controlled substance, $285.50 costs, seven years penitentiary, three years determinate, four indeterminate, three days credited, 365 days retained jurisdiction, sentence to run concurrent to 2017 case.

Andrew Michael Hawley, 31, Las Vegas, Nevada; 33 charges possessing or accessing child sexually exploitive material by any means dismissed. Two charges possessing or accessing child sexually exploitive material by any means, $545.50 costs, 10 years penitentiary, three determinate, seven years indeterminate, credit for time served, sentence suspended, four years supervised probation each. Possessing or accessing child sexually exploitive material by any means, 10 years penitentiary, three determinate, seven years indeterminate, credit for time served. Fourth charge possessing or accessing child sexually exploitive material by any means, 10 years penitentiary, three determinate, seven years indeterminate, credit for time served.

Kaylea Danielle Sartor, 38, Twin Falls; DUI third or subsequent offense, $290.50 costs, $500 public defender, $100 DNA, six years penitentiary, three determinate, three indeterminate, 52 days credited, 365 days retained jurisdiction, one year drivers license suspension, two years interlock device to follow suspension.

Tyler Zackary Andre, 32, Twin Falls; $285.50 costs, $500 public defender, seven years penitentiary, three determinate, four indeterminate, 48 days credited, 365 days retained jurisdiction.

Tori Lyn McKinley, 33, Twin Falls; possession of a controlled substance, $285.50 costs, $60 workmans comp. program fee, seven years penitentiary, three determinate, four indeterminate, 46 days credited, 365 days retained jurisdiction.

Chandler Lee Palmer-Holcomb, 24, Twin Falls; possession of a controlled substance, $285.50 costs, seven years penitentiary, three determinate, four indeterminate, 34 days credited. Attempt to flee or elude a police officer in a motor vehicle, $245.50 costs, five years penitentiary, 34 days credited, sentence to run concurrent to 2014 case and other charge, one year drivers license suspension.

Skylar Wade Meade, 24, Filer; Attempt to flee or elude a police officer in a motor vehicle charge dismissed. Possession of a controlled substance, $285.50 costs, five year’s determinate penitentiary, 110 days credited, sentence to run concurrent to 2010 case. Assaulting a police or correctional officer, $245.50 costs, 20 years penitentiary, 10 determinate, 10 indeterminate, 110 days credited, sentence to run concurrent to 2010 case. Unlawful discharge of a weapon charge dismissed. Unlawful possession of a weapon by a convicted felon, $245.50 costs, five years determinate, 110 days credited, sentence to run concurrent to 2010 case. Three other charges unlawful possession of a weapon by a convicted felon charge dismissed. No drivers license charge dismissed.

Skylar Wade Meade, 24, Filer; major contraband introduced or convey, possess, receive, obtain or remove contraband in a correctional facility, $275.50 costs, five years penitentiary, sentence to run concurrent to 2010 and other 2016 case.

Dustin Gregory Lee, 26, Gooding; possession of a controlled substance, $285.50 costs, $60 days workmans comp. program fee, seven years penitentiary, three determinate, four indeterminate, 31 days credited, 365 days retained jurisdiction, sentence to run concurrent to 2013 case and Jerome 2010 case.

DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE SENTENCINGS

Corey Michael Edwards, 24, Twin Falls; DUI excessive,$500 fine, $202.50 costs, 180 days jail, 151 suspended, credit for time served, 365 days drivers license suspension, 12 months supervised probation.

Timothy Allen Stastny, 45, Kimberly; DUI, $400 fine, $202.50 costs, $100 restitution, 180 days jail, 178 suspended, one day credited, eight hours work detail, 180 days restitution, 12 months supervised probation.

Alexander Ray Palmer, 24, Buhl; DUI, $400 fine, $202.50 costs, $75 public defender, 180 days jail, 175 suspended, one day credited, guilty withheld sentence, 180 days restricted drivers license suspension, 12 months supervised probation.

Blake K. Worsley, 35, Twin Falls; DUI, $400 fine, $202.50 costs, $75 public defender, 180 days jail, balance suspended, credit for time served, guilty withheld judgment, 180 days restricted drivers license, 12 months supervised probation.

Lani Jo Lee Stafford, 26, Twin Falls; DUI, $400 fine, $202.50 costs, $75 public defender, 180 days jail, 175 suspended, two days jail, 16 hours work detail, 180 days restricted drivers license, 12 months supervised probation. Injury to a child when adult transports minor in a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol, $100 fine, 180 days jail, 176 suspended, two days credited.

Leslie Chad Steube, 27, Twin Falls; DUI, $400 fine, $202.50 costs, 180 days jail, 170 suspended, two days credited, 180 days jail, 12 months supervised probation. Fleeing or attempting to elude a police officer in a motor vehicle, $100 fine, 180 days jail, 170 suspended, two days credited.

Roy Dean Garcia, 32, Twin Falls; DUI second offense, $700 fine, $202.50 costs, 365 days jail, 355 suspended, one day credited, 365 days restricted drivers license, 24 months supervised probation, complete the veterans treatment court program.

Demetrea Helen Stephens, 49, Twin Falls; $500 fine, $202.50 costs, 365 days jail, 355 suspended, one day credited, 365 days jail, 12 months supervised probation, attend victim impact panel.

DIVORCE CIVIL PROCEEDINGS

Stephen Petty v. Lezley Petty

Athena Jacobsen v. Phillip Termini

Shelley Wray v. Tanner Wray

Eric Espinosa v. Madison Quinones

Steven Smith v. Karen Smith

Sara Smithson v. Brandon Smithson

Thomas Miller v. Rocky Miller

Elizabeth Robinson v. Health Robinson

Mary Wengert v. Norman Wengert

Chelsea Tucker v. Ryan Tucker

Brianne Roberts v. Colby Roberts


Crime-and-courts
5th District Court News: Twin Falls County

Twin Falls County

Friday arraignments

Rene Anthony Jio, 48, Twin Falls; grand theft by possession of stolen property, destruction, alteration of concealment of evidence, $100,000 bond, public defender appointed, preliminary hearing Feb. 17.

Lisa Marie McGinnis, 41, Twin Falls; grand theft by possession of stolen property, destruction, alteration of concealment of evidence, $75,000 bond, public defender appointed, preliminary hearing Feb. 17.

Brent Leon Fairchild, 29, Buhl; criminal conspiracy, own recognizance release, public defender appointed, pretrial Feb. 28.

Edward Dean Olson, 56, Caldwell; possession of a controlled substance, $75,000 bond, public defender appointed, preliminary hearing Feb. 17.

Laramie Ross Bingham, 36, Blackfoot; possession of a controlled substance, own recognizance release, to hire private counsel, preliminary hearing Feb. 17.

Katherine Ann Raynal, 35, Twin Falls; two counts forgery, $25,000 bond, public defender appointed, preliminary hearing Feb. 17.

Edgar Roberto Vega-Cervantes, 19, Hansen; disturbing the peace, $500 bond, public defender appointed, pretrial April 4.

Sandra Mae Thomas, 33, Twin Falls; possession of a controlled substance, $25,000 bond, public defender appointed, preliminary hearing Feb. 17.

Benjamin Carlos Miranda, 26, Twin Falls; petit theft, own recognizance release, public defender appointed, pretrial March 21.


Local
Clearing the way for a national park

BOISE — State lawmakers, staffers for the congressional delegation, county commissioners, lawyers and professors gathered in a hearing room at the capitol Wednesday to try to clear the path to turn Craters of the Moon National Monument into Idaho’s first national park.

The idea has overwhelming local support. The commissioners of every county bordering Craters have passed resolutions in support. And in a November advisory ballot measure, 57 percent of voters in Butte County, which would be most heavily affected, supported the idea as well.

This week, Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter joined in, telling reporters at an Idaho Press Club breakfast that he would support the change as long as it didn’t affect local land management, according to the Idaho Statesman.

“We’ve jumped through the hoops. We’ve done what you’ve asked,” said Helen Merrill, an Arco chiropractor who has helped organize the push for a national park.

Now what locals need is help from state lawmakers and Congress. The advocates want lawmakers to introduce a resolution to be transmitted to Congress expressing the state’s support.

The only opposition has come from the Idaho Farm Bureau.

Sen. Jeff Siddoway, R-Terreton, opened the informal meeting, which stretched for nearly two hours. Representatives Van Burtenshaw, R-Terreton, and Karey Hanks, R-St. Anthony, were also present. All three represent District 35, which encompasses Butte, Clark, Jefferson and Fremont counties.

“I’m willing to stay until we come to some kind of a resolution,” Siddoway said.

The Idaho Farm Bureau previously expressed concerns that a change in designation could endanger commerce along a section of U.S. 26 between Carey and Arco, which is used by many area farmers to transport hay.

Organizers gathered experts in an attempt to demonstrate, once and for all, that those concerns don’t have any basis in reality.

Butte County Prosecutor Steve Stephens pointed out that President Franklin Roosevelt had given Idaho possession of the roadway in the 1940s.

“Roosevelt basically redrew the boundaries of the original monument, taking the highway out of the monument,” he said.

Jason Minzghor, the Idaho Transportation Department’s District 6 engineer, said he thought some confusion arose because the roads in Yellowstone National Park are owned and regulated by the federal government. Yellowstone was created before Idaho was a state, he said, but at Craters, Idaho owns the road plus 120 feet of right-of-way on either side.

“As long as we can maintain and own it, we don’t have any issues,” he said.

Representatives of the Farm Bureau weren’t originally present, but Siddoway left to find Russ Hendricks, the group’s director of governmental affairs and chief lobbyist.

There were two primary issues Hendricks raised after being summoned to the discussion.

First, the Farm Bureau doesn’t trust the word of the federal government. Whatever protections for agriculture are put into the deal, the group is skeptical the feds will follow through.

Second, the Farm Bureau is concerned that the very thing that advocates hope will boost the local economy — raising the profile of Craters — could bring unwanted additional scrutiny to ranchers from environmental groups.

“We’re very leery,” he said.

Hendricks said promises had been made to ranchers and broken by the feds before. When bighorn sheep were being reintroduced to Hells Canyon, domesticated sheep ranchers received assurances it wouldn’t impact them.

Hendricks provided a copy of a 1997 letter signed by representatives of the Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, the Foundation for North American Wild Sheep, and the fish and game departments of Idaho, Oregon and Washington.

“The committee recognizes the existing domestic sheep operations in or adjacent to the Hells Canyon Complex, on both National Forest and private lands, and accepts the potential risk of disease transmission and loss of bighorn sheep when bighorns invade domestic sheep operations,” the letter stated.

But 10 years later, faced with a lawsuit from the Western Watersheds Project and other groups for failing to examine the environmental impact of grazing allotments there, the Forest Service stopped sheep grazing in Hells Canyon.

Hendricks also pointed to two other incidents — the use of ATVs by farmers in Owyhee County and proposed routing of a power line through the Birds of Prey National Conservation Area — in which ranchers feel promises haven’t been kept.

There’s a key difference between the incidents Hendricks pointed to and the proposed national park at Craters, explained John Freemuth, executive director of the Andrus Center for Public Policy. In each of those cases, ranchers were dealing with executive agencies and their rules.

“But only Congress can create a national park,” he said.

And the stipulations that Congress puts into legislation aren’t promises. They’re laws.

Butte County Commissioner Rose Bernal said she had contacted every rancher who has a grazing allotment in the preserve that was created on the outskirts of the national monument, and none of them were opposed to a national park.

Bernal ended with a plea to the lawmakers and the congressional delegation. Butte County’s economy is struggling, she said. And because of that, the county is losing population at the second-highest rate in the state.

But if more tourists would stop and stay at Craters, that would mean an influx of jobs and spending that could help keep the struggling county economically viable.

“Help us help ourselves,” Bernal said.


Local
Dutch Bros to raise donatations for food boxes

TWIN FALLS — Dutch Bros plans to celebrate the company’s Dutch Luv Day on Tuesday with a fundraiser for South Central Community Action Partnership.

The local franchise will donate $1 for every drink sold that day. The money will go toward food boxes for families and individuals in need.

“We are excited to celebrate Valentine’s Day by showing our communities love,” Dutch Bros co-founder Travis Boersma said in a statement. “Dutch Luv Day is a day we are able to come together as a community to serve people who are in need of food.”

Last year, Dutch Bros Twin Falls donated $2,260 to Twin Falls South Central Community Action Partnership. It is hoping to surpass that amount this year.

“No man, women or child should ever be forced to go without a meal, or have to choose between paying utilities bills or purchasing food,” Boersma said. “These local organizations that we have the opportunity to partner with on Dutch Luv Day are working towards a common goal — to eliminate hunger in our communities.”


Local
Bereavement camp offers support for children

TWIN FALLS — Any child old enough to love is old enough to grieve, says the Kids Count Too! Grief Center.

The grief group for children and teens plans to hold its Winter Bereavement Day Camp next month to allow kids who have lost a loved one to share their feelings in a fun and supportive atmosphere.

The camp will be from 8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 4 at 588 Addison Ave. W. in Twin Falls. Because of community support, the camp is free.

Trained and professional members of the Kids Count Too! team will guide the children through a variety of special activities as they deal with their own personal grief.

In addition, “The Grief Process: A Roller Coaster of Emotions,” a free learning session for parents or guardians of participating children, will run from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. the same day.

Deadline for camp registration is Feb. 24. If a minimum number is not reached, the camp may be postponed.

The camp is sponsored by Parke’s Funeral Home, Thrivent Financial Corporation, St. Luke’s Community Health Initiative, Idaho Gives, Twin Falls Kiwanis Club, Twin Falls Health Initiative Trust, Twin Falls Lions Club and Jump Time.


Local
Annual water meeting scheduled

IDAHO FALLS — The annual meeting of the water users of Water District No. 1 will be held at 9 a.m. March 7 at Keefer’s Convention Center at Shilo Inn, 780 Lindsay Blvd., in Idaho Falls.

Contact Wendy Murphy at 208-525-7161 for lunch reservations.

If special assistance is needed due to a disability, contact the water district.


Local
Stork report: births at St. Luke’s Magic Valley

St. Luke’s Magic Valley

Ender John Campbell, son of Jennifer Obray Campbell and Logan Matthew Campbell of Twin Falls, was born Feb. 1, 2017.

Ayla Claire Graves, daughter of Nichole Ann and Michael Craig Graves of Gooding, was born Feb. 2, 2017.

Kareli Martinez Garcia, daughter of Jasmine Julie Martinez and Gildardo Xavier Martinez Guadarrama of Hagerman, was born Feb. 3, 2017.

Josie Kay Baird, daughter of Breka Lexis Van Leeuwen and Nathaniel Scott Baird of Kimberly, was born Feb. 3, 2017.

Kasen Robb McCurdy, son of Leslie Kay Peck McCurdy and Jeffrey Clark McCurdy of Twin Falls, was born Feb. 4, 2017.

Fernando Jose Martinez, son of Ana Silvia Guadarrama and Jose Fernando Martinez of Kimberly, was born Feb. 5, 2017.

Christian Patrick-Randall Campos, son of Sarah Dainyel Campos and Eduardo Aguinaga Campos Jr. of Twin Falls, was born Feb. 6, 2017.

Bridget Amelia Faria, daughter of Marijo Alicia and Manuel Steven Faria of Kimberly, was born Feb. 6, 2017.

River Ann Lancaster and Stetson Wayne Curtis Lancaster, twins, daughter and son of Ashley Morgan Lancaster and Grant Alan Lancaster of Twin Falls, were born Feb. 6, 2017.

Bonnie Nicole Hartley, daughter of Janaye Nicole and Kurt Russell Hartley of Heyburn, was born Feb. 7, 2017.

Brooklyn Rae Fisher, daughter of Tiffani Rae and Chase Derek Fisher of Twin Falls, was born Feb. 8, 2017.


Snowpack

Today’s Median

Salmon 120%

Big Wood 169%

Little Wood 164%

Big Lost 163%

Little Lost 131%

Henrys Fork/Teton 120%

Upper Snake Basin 158%

Goose Creek 122%

Salmon Falls 113%

Today’s median peak compares water content with what is normally seen on this day.

As of Feb. 15.


POST REGISTER FILE PHOTO  

A Butte County group is continuing its push this year to make Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve into Idaho’s first national park.