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Local
Hidden History: Early Immigrant Jimmy Yamamoto

Editor’s note: This Hidden History column first ran June 4, 2015, in the Times-News and on Magicvalley.com

Jimmy Yamamoto lied to his boss that night in 1915 when he said he was tired and needed to rest.

Yamamoto, 18, had spent three years laboring on a Japanese ship while looking for a chance to slip undetected into the United States.

Under immigration laws at the time, he could not legally enter the U.S.

“I knew if I got caught, that was the end,” he told the Times-News 66 years later. “Immigration officials stood on the dock, making sure no Orientals left the ships.”

When his ship docked at Tacoma, Wash., that night, he saw his chance to escape a life of poverty and start anew in America.

Instead of going to his quarters to rest, Yamamoto, with no money and knowing little English, slid into the water and swam to a pier. Then, under the cover of darkness, he disappeared into the woods.

Yamamoto had planned his daring escape well; he carried in his pockets several valuable silk handkerchiefs he could easily sell for American money.

People “were pretty good to me,” he said, giving him food and asking no questions even though they suspected he was from a ship.

He made his way to Seattle, where he took the first job offered to him — in a salmon cannery.

Yamamoto worked numerous jobs over the next two years as he searched for a place to call home. He finally found that place on the Camas Prairie at Fairfield. Harry Geisler hired him to farm there in 1917.

Meanwhile, Matsuyo Kanno was born in Idaho Falls. Her Issei parents, Yuki and Heiji Kanno, left Japan for Hawaii in the 1890s after their marriage.

Yamamoto and Matsuyo, who took the name Mary, were married in 1931. Yamamoto purchased property in 1941 and began farming for himself.

In December that year, the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. One of eight Kanno sisters, who lived on the West Coast, had to sell her fine furniture and move to an inland Japanese internment camp.

The Yamamotos were spared that fate.

Eventually, Congress passed legislation allowing people of Japanese birth to become U.S. citizens and Yamamoto became a citizen in 1953. He retired from farming in 1966 and the couple moved to Gooding. Yamamoto died in 1991.

Yamamoto was called “James” only in his obituary. His Japanese name is not known.


Local
Gooding County Historical Society to unveil restored schoolhouse

GOODING — The Gooding County Historical Society will hold a grand opening Saturday of its newly restored 105-year-old schoolhouse.

The one-room school, built in 1912 at Thorn Creek, 11 miles northeast of Gooding, was donated to the historical society and rehabilitated at the museum site.

The society members raised $13,000 in donations to restore the building, museum Director Lorna Bard said Wednesday.

The school operated at Thorn Creek, a community of ranch families, until it merged with the Gooding School District in 1947. Seventeen students attended the school in 1941, Bard said.

Two families competed for the school in 1912, she said. Then the “losing” family moved the finished building more than a mile in the dead of night, on skids over snow and frozen ground, to its longtime site. By 1920, the eight-grade school had outhouses, a windmill and a teacherage.

Norma Moody Burnum, the only student in her class, was the last student to graduate from the school.

In 1991, the schoolhouse was donated to the Gooding County Fairgrounds by Frank and Alma Varin. The building was moved for the final time to the Gooding museum in 2010.


Local
Jerome selects deputy fire chief

JEROME — Mike Harrison has been named Jerome’s new deputy fire chief.

The position has been vacant since former Deputy Chief Jeremy Presnell was sworn in as fire chief.

Harrison, who had been serving as a lieutenant, has been with the Jerome fire department since 2008.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in occupational safety and health, with a concentration in fire science, along with numerous other fire and rescue certifications.

Harrison has been a member of the Jerome community since 1980 and resides here with his wife Shanna and two boys, Nolan and Brett.


Crime-and-courts
5th District Court News: Twin Falls County

Twin Falls County

Tuesday arraignments

Everardo Alvarez, 28, Twin Falls; possession of a controlled substance, possession of paraphernalia, $10,000 bond, public defender appointed, prelim. Oct. 20.

Karla J. Mola, 31, Renton, Wash.; possession of a controlled substance, possession of a controlled substance, released on own recognizance, public defender appointed, prelim. Oct. 20.

Lisa Ann Frye, 50, Boise; inhalation of intoxicants, released on own recognizance, public defender appointed, pretrial Dec. 5.

Austin Conner McConnell, 20, Wendell; possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver, released on own recognizance, private counsel, prelim. Oct. 20.

Tyler Jermane Owens, 25, Twin Falls; unlawful possession of a firearm by a felon, possession of a controlled substance, $20,000 bond, public defender appointed, prelim. Oct. 20.

Nicholas Ray Barnes, 30, Filer; controlled substance — manufacture or deliver, or possession with intent to manufacture or deliver — five counts, delivery of a controlled substance in presence of a child — two counts, $25,000 bond, private counsel, prelim. Oct 20.

Dennis James Chatham, 34, Twin Falls; possession of a controlled substance, $10,000 bond, public defender appointed, prelim Oct. 20.

Dennis James Chatham, 34, Twin Falls; robbery, conspiracy to commit robbery, burglary, $250,000 bond, public defender appointed, prelim. Oct. 20.

Phillip Martin Arnold, 35, Kimberly; driving under the influence, released on own recognizance, public defender appointed, pretrial Dec. 5.

Fred J. Morton, 44, Twin Falls; violation of no contact order, released on own recognizance, public defender appointed, pretrial Nov. 28.

Richelle Lee Spencer, 41, Twin Falls; aggravated assault with a deadly weapon or instrument, battery, $20,000 bond, public defender appointed, prelim. Oct. 20.

Christopher John Hammann, 47, Twin Falls; battery — domestic violence without traumatic injury against a household member, $2,500 bond, public defender appointed, pretrial Nov. 28.

Stephen Tyler Ellifrits, 25, Twin Falls; battery — domestic violence without traumatic injury against a household member, released on own recognizance, pretrial Nov. 21.

Wednesday arraignments

Gregory Alan Scruggs, 31, Twin Falls; use or possession of drug paraphernalia with intent to use, failure to appear, $1,000 bond, public defender appointed, pretrial Nov. 28.

George Steven Ray, 37, Spokane, Wash.; possession of a controlled substance, possession of paraphernalia, released on own recognizance, public defender appointed, pretrial Dec. 5.

Jim W. Rogers, Jr., 39, Twin Falls; burglary, petit theft, $2,000 bond, public defender appointed, prelim. Oct. 20.

Pamela Kathleen Etzler, 22, Twin Falls; burglary, petit theft, released on own recognizance, public defender appointed, prelim Oct. 20.

Amanda R. Adamson, 26, Twin Falls; driving under the influence — excessive, bond previously posted, public defender appointed, pretrial Nov. 28.

Robert B. Otero, 71, Twin Falls; driving under the influence — second offense within ten years, bond previously posted, private counsel, pretrial Nov. 28.

Samoa Joseph Allen, 22, Twin Falls; driving under the influence — second offense, bond previously posted, public defender denied, pretrial Nov. 28.

Sofonias B. Bedane, 35, Twin Falls; driving under the influence — second offense within ten years, bond previously posted, public defender appointed, pretrial Nov 28.


Ap
Tech and health care stocks take indexes back to records

Tech and health care stocks take indexes back to records

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes drifted back to record highs Wednesday as investors got ready for another round of corporate reports to begin. Technology, health care and household goods companies all rose.

Technology companies like PayPal, Visa, and Google’s parent company Alphabet made some of the biggest gains as the market was little changed for the third day in a row. Banks slipped along with interest rates and industrial companies took small losses.

Minutes from the Federal Reserve’s September meeting showed officials were split about whether they need to raise interest rates again soon. But they appeared to be getting used to the idea that inflation is going to stay lower than they had hoped. For years it’s come up short of their 2-percent target.

Kristina Hooper, global markets strategist for Invesco, said one reason for that low inflation is continued fallout from the financial crisis a decade ago. In her view, many of the jobs that were lost after the 2008-09 meltdown were replaced by lower-paying ones.

“There are still a good portion of Americans who are making less today than they made before the global financial crisis,” she said. “That’s playing a role in lower wage growth and low inflation.”

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index gained 4.60 points, or 0.2 percent, to 2,555.24. The Dow Jones industrial average added 42.21 points, or 0.2 percent, to 22,872.89. The Nasdaq composite rose 16.30 points, or 0.2 percent, to 6,603.55. All three indexes finished at all-time highs. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks edged down 1.08 points, or 0.1 percent, to 1,506.92.

Hooper said inflation might increase if President Donald Trump and Congress pass a tax cut that encourages businesses to invest more money. She said that businesses and consumers both feel optimistic about the economy, but they’re reluctant to spend money because they’re not sure what economic policy will look like.

Airlines rose for the second day in a row. Delta Air Lines’ profit and revenue were better than analysts anticipated, and the company also issued a strong forecast for the fourth quarter. Delta rose 37 cents to $53.07. It has surged 9 percent since Oct. 3, when it raised its third-quarter projections. JetBlue gained 30 cents, or 1.5 percent, to $20.53 after it gave an update on the revenue it lost following hurricanes Irma and Maria.

Johnson & Johnson led health care companies higher after it asked regulators to approve its drug apalutamide. It’s intended for patients with a hard-to-treat form of prostate cancer. Johnson & Johnson stock climbed $2.75, or 2.1 percent, to $136.65.

Bond prices rose. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.35 percent from 2.36 percent. That sent affected bank stocks because lower yields mean lower interest rates on loans, and lower profits for banks.

JPMorgan Chase and Citigroup will report their quarterly results Thursday morning as bank earnings get started.

An upset loss by the U.S. men’s soccer team dented shares of Twenty-First Century Fox. The team will miss the 2018 World Cup following its loss to Trinidad and Tobago. That could cut into advertising revenue for Fox, which will broadcast the event. The stock fell 66 cents, or 2.5 percent, to $26.11.

Luxury handbag and accessories maker Coach said it will change its name to Tapestry at the end of October. It bought the Kate Spade and Stuart Weitzman brands over the last few years and said it wants its name to reflect its growth beyond the iconic Coach brand. The stock lost $1.13, or 2.8 percent, to $38.87.

Sears sagged after the company’s former Canadian unit asked a court to allow it to liquidate its 130 remaining stores. Sears Canada said it couldn’t find a buyer to allow it to stay in business. Sears Canada was split off from Sears Holdings in 2014, but the U.S. business has also been struggling for years and investors are unsure about its future. On Wednesday the stock lost 46 cents, or 6.9 percent, to $6.24.

Benchmark U.S. crude oil rose 38 cents to $51.30 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, added 33 cents to $56.94 a barrel in London.

Wholesale gasoline picked up 2 cents to $1.61 a gallon. Heating oil gained 2 cents to $1.79 a gallon. Natural gas remained at $2.89 per 1,000 cubic feet.

Gold fell $4.90 to $1,288.90 an ounce. Silver lost 7 cents to $17.13 an ounce. Copper gained 4 cents to $3.10 a pound.

The dollar rose to 112.42 yen from 112.37 yen. The euro rose to $1.1855 from $1.1804.

The German DAX added 0.2 percent and the FTSE 100 in Britain slipped 0.1 percent. France’s CAC 40 took a small loss. The Spanish Ibex 35 rose 1.3 percent after the Catalan regional government stopped short of declaring independence. Late Tuesday regional President Carles Puigdemont said Catalonia should hold talks with the Spanish central government after a landslide result in an independence referendum earlier this month.

The Madrid-based government has given few hints it is willing to talk since it does not consider the vote to be valid.

Japan’s Nikkei 225 index rose 0.3 percent and closed at another 21-year high. South Korea’s Kospi rose 1 percent but the Hang Seng in Hong Kong ended 0.4 percent lower.



Print-specific
Stocks of local interest

AlliantEg s 1.22 23 43.68 -.42 +15.3

Aon plc 1.44 21 143.25 -.21 +28.4

BallardPw ... ... 5.11 +.07 +209.7

BkofAm .48 15 26.51 +.02 +20.0

ConAgra .85 19 34.80 +.84 -12.0

Costco 2.00 28 171.36 +2.25 +7.0

Diebold .40 20 18.15 -.15 -27.8

DukeEngy 3.56 20 88.89 -.74 +14.5

DukeRlty .80f 23 28.96 +.03 +9.0

Fastenal 1.28 25 47.59 +.05 +1.3

HP Inc .53 14 21.23 -.11 +43.1

HomeDp 3.56 24 164.11 +.84 +22.4

Idacorp 2.36f 23 95.17 -.12 +18.2

Keycorp .38 16 17.65 -.21 -3.4

Lee Ent ... 5 2.35 ... -19.0

MicronT ... 9 44.78 +1.28 +104.3

OrbitATK 1.28 23 132.96 +.21 +51.6

Sensient 1.32f 23 74.52 -.14 -5.2

SkyWest .32 15 45.90 +.10 +25.9

Teradyn .28 20 43.70 +.06 +72.0

Tuppwre 2.72 13 58.83 +.15 +11.8

US Bancrp 1.20f 15 51.61 -.50 +.5

Valhi .08 39 4.30 +.07 +24.3

WalMart 2.04 20 90.92 +.62 +31.5

WashFed .60 17 33.45 +.50 -2.6

WellsFargo 1.56f 13 53.81 -.19 -2.4

WestRck 1.72f ... 58.66 -.37 +15.5

ZionsBcp .64f 17 43.93 -.04 +2.1


Print-specific
Markets

Valley Beans

Prices are net to growers, 100 pounds, U.S. No. 1 beans, less Idaho bean tax and storage charges. Prices subject to change without notice. Producers desiring more recent price information should contact dealers.

Other Idaho bean prices are collected by Bean Market News, U.S. Department of Agriculture pintos, $24.50; pinks, not established; small reds, not established; garbanzos, $40.50, Quotes current Oct 17.

Valley Grains

Prices for wheat per bushel mixed grain, oats, corn and beans per hundredweight. Prices subject to change without notice.

Wheat, $3.45, New barley, $6.00 (cwt) corn, $7.20 (cwt) oats, $5.45 (cwt). Prices are given by Rangen in Buhl. Prices current Oct. 16.

Corn, $7.43 (cwt) barley, $5.75 (cwt) wheat, $3.65 (bushel). Prices quoted by JD Heiskell. Prices current Oct. 18.

Cheese

Barrels $1.685 +0.25 Blocks $1.72 +0.5 Prices current Oct. 17.


Print-specific
Streamflows

Average daily flows Snake River at Heise 4,609 cfs

Snake River at Blackfoot 5,341 cfs

Snake River at American Falls 3,022 cfs

Snake River at Minidoka 2,306 cfs

Snake River at Milner 351 cfs

Little Wood River near Carey 111 cfs

Jackson Lake is 75 percent full.

Palisades Reservoir is 91 percent full.

American Falls Reservoir is 54 percent full.

Upper Snake River system is at 72 percent capacity.

As of Oct. 17.


MYCHEL MATTHEWS, TIMES-NEWS PHOTO ILLUSTRATION  

Jimmy Yamamoto, seen at age 83 in an illustration made from a 1981 photo, risked everything to enter the United States in 1915.


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